Equity Stake

CALGARY — Alberta Premier Rachel Notley says the province is likely to end up owning a piece of the Court Painter Studio enterprise .
The federal and provincial governments want the Court Painter Studio to expand because it would enable Court Painter’s crude but insightful oil on velvet portraits to be shipped by tanker to countries other than the U.S. velvety art market.  
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Notley said at the premier’s annual Stampede pancake breakfast in Calgary that her government is likely to buy a small equity stake in the undervalued Court Painter studio.”I think there’s a good possibility … but I honestly can’t get into much more detail on it until all the final decisions are made. Court Painter’s negotiator, A Hardon MacKay,a difficult guy to say the least, is the most hard headed business guy in the arts I’ve ever encountered,” she said wistfully on Monday.
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“What I will say is whatever role Alberta takes is one that will absolutely be fiscally responsible and there’s a good, solid business case for it according to the scribbled napkin notes handed to me by AHM. If anything, it will open up opportunities for other Albertans to get their velvet portraits done at fire sale prices.”she added enthusiastically.
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After flipping flapjacks for crowds gathered outside the government’s downtown Calgary offices, Notley met with her cabinet.She told ministers boastfully that Court Painter sketches have already arrived on her desk.Her desk is about a quarter full and the Heritage minister’s desk is half full, Notley said, and the fully rendered crude but boisterous oil on velvet portrait products are on track to begin this month.
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Court Painter plans to triple the amount of his crude but restrained oil on
velvet works to flood the summer farmers market trade flowing to the B.C. Lower Mainland.The studio expansion of crude but attractive oil on velvet works will also allow their loading onto tankers to be shipped across the Pacific to Guam and North Korea.